Has your partner been unusually impatient and irritated lately? Has she been less enthusiastic or engaged in her work? Are clients starting to complain about her dependability?

Have you been noticing the recent formation of cliques at your workplace? Are employees taking off more days for sickness or coming in late more frequently? Do staff meetings seem more like griping sessions that are dispiriting and unproductive?

Business | Workplace Mediation

Has your partner been unusually impatient and irritated lately? Has she been less enthusiastic or engaged in her work? Are clients starting to complain about her dependability?

Have you been noticing the recent formation of cliques at your workplace? Are employees taking off more days for sickness or coming in late more frequently? Do staff meetings seem more like griping sessions that are dispiriting and unproductive?

If you've answered “yes” to any of these questions, you’re not alone.

Welcome to the world of business & workplace conflict.

Conflict in business relationships and within the workplace is unavoidable.

Differences in temperament or personality, work or leadership style, ethnic background, family background, personal history, political affiliation—qualities that can contribute to the rich diversity of a workplace—can also lead to misunderstandings, disagreements, office politics, gossip and rumors, and animosity.

A breakdown in communication or confusion about roles and responsibilities can also sow the seeds of conflict. There may be disagreements over priorities and how tasks should be delegated. And, of course, people have the unfortunate tendency to form opinions about the motives of others based on limited information.

As normal and (though it may surprise you) healthy as conflict may be, when conflict isn’t addressed skillfully early on, it can spin out of control and become toxic and destructive.

Signs of advanced conflict:

  • Low morale
  • Reduced work quality
  • Decreased productivity
  • Increased absenteeism
  • Grievances (and eventually litigation)

What You Can Do About Conflict:

  1. Be alert for early signs of conflict. An indication that something is amiss may be as simple as an inappropriate comment at a meeting, a snubbed co-worker, or repeated complaints by the same employee.
  2. Address the conflict as soon as possible. It is never a good option to ignore conflict since it has a nasty tendency of becoming toxic and damaging. Address it swiftly and effectively. If this isn’t your skill set or your role, report it to the appropriate individual—a manager, team leader, or HR staff—or, if you do not have someone who is trained in conflict management skills, consult a conflict specialist, like me.

What I can do for you:

I can help you manage conflicts constructively and improve working relationships.

Examples of business-related conflicts that I can help you with:

  • Disputes between principals
  • Management power struggles
  • Disagreements over the direction of the business
  • Breach of a verbal agreement
  • Contract disputes with a partner, employee, business, or customer
  • Conflicts with or among employees
  • Partnership dissolution

Types of Businesses & Organizations:

Conflict management and resolution services can benefit a variety of organizations and businesses:

  • Law Firms
  • Nonprofits
  • Condo, Coop & Homeowner Association Disputes
  • Religious Congregations
  • Art galleries
  • Consultancy firms (business, financial)
  • Dental & medical practices
  • Family businesses
  • Real estate companies
  • Restaurants
  • Startups
  • Website design firms